Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/659248
Title: Motion Effects Synthesis for 4D Films
Authors: Jaebong Lee;Bohyung Han;Seungmoon Choi
subject: motion cueing|4D film|motion simulator|multi-sensory theater|motion effects|automatic generation|synthesis
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: 4D film is an immersive entertainment system that presents various physical effects with a film in order to enhance viewers' experiences. Despite the recent emergence of 4D theaters, production of 4D effects relies on manual authoring. In this paper, we present algorithms that synthesize three classes of motion effects from the audiovisual content of a film. The first class of motion effects is those responding to fast camera motion to enhance the immersiveness of point-of-view shots, delivering fast and dynamic vestibular feedback. The second class moves viewers as closely as possible to the trajectory of slowly moving camera. Such motion provides an illusional effect of observing the scene from a distance while moving slowly within the scene. For these two classes, our algorithms compute the relative camera motion and then map it to a motion command to the 4D chair using appropriate motion mapping algorithms. The last class is for special effects, such as explosions, and our algorithm uses sound for the synthesis of impulses and vibrations. We assessed the subjective quality of our algorithms by user experiments, and results indicated that our algorithms can provide compelling motion effects.
Description: 
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/146120
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/659248
ISSN: 1077-2626
volume: 22
issue: 10
Appears in Collections:2016

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Title: Motion Effects Synthesis for 4D Films
Authors: Jaebong Lee;Bohyung Han;Seungmoon Choi
subject: motion cueing|4D film|motion simulator|multi-sensory theater|motion effects|automatic generation|synthesis
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: 4D film is an immersive entertainment system that presents various physical effects with a film in order to enhance viewers' experiences. Despite the recent emergence of 4D theaters, production of 4D effects relies on manual authoring. In this paper, we present algorithms that synthesize three classes of motion effects from the audiovisual content of a film. The first class of motion effects is those responding to fast camera motion to enhance the immersiveness of point-of-view shots, delivering fast and dynamic vestibular feedback. The second class moves viewers as closely as possible to the trajectory of slowly moving camera. Such motion provides an illusional effect of observing the scene from a distance while moving slowly within the scene. For these two classes, our algorithms compute the relative camera motion and then map it to a motion command to the 4D chair using appropriate motion mapping algorithms. The last class is for special effects, such as explosions, and our algorithm uses sound for the synthesis of impulses and vibrations. We assessed the subjective quality of our algorithms by user experiments, and results indicated that our algorithms can provide compelling motion effects.
Description: 
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/146120
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/659248
ISSN: 1077-2626
volume: 22
issue: 10
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
7352357.pdf1.76 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Preview File
Title: Motion Effects Synthesis for 4D Films
Authors: Jaebong Lee;Bohyung Han;Seungmoon Choi
subject: motion cueing|4D film|motion simulator|multi-sensory theater|motion effects|automatic generation|synthesis
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: 4D film is an immersive entertainment system that presents various physical effects with a film in order to enhance viewers' experiences. Despite the recent emergence of 4D theaters, production of 4D effects relies on manual authoring. In this paper, we present algorithms that synthesize three classes of motion effects from the audiovisual content of a film. The first class of motion effects is those responding to fast camera motion to enhance the immersiveness of point-of-view shots, delivering fast and dynamic vestibular feedback. The second class moves viewers as closely as possible to the trajectory of slowly moving camera. Such motion provides an illusional effect of observing the scene from a distance while moving slowly within the scene. For these two classes, our algorithms compute the relative camera motion and then map it to a motion command to the 4D chair using appropriate motion mapping algorithms. The last class is for special effects, such as explosions, and our algorithm uses sound for the synthesis of impulses and vibrations. We assessed the subjective quality of our algorithms by user experiments, and results indicated that our algorithms can provide compelling motion effects.
Description: 
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/146120
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/659248
ISSN: 1077-2626
volume: 22
issue: 10
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
7352357.pdf1.76 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Preview File