Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/166232
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLucie L&x00E9;v&x00EA;queen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei Zhangen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristine Cavaro-M&x00E9;narden_US
dc.contributor.authorPatrick Le Calleten_US
dc.contributor.authorHantao Liuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-06T07:24:21Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-06T07:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2704285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://localhost/handle/Hannan/166232-
dc.descriptionen_US
dc.description.abstractTelemedicine provides a transformative practice for access to and delivery of timely and high-quality healthcare in resource-poor settings. In a typical scenario of telesurgery, surgical tasks are performed with one surgeon situated at the patient's side and one expert surgeon from a remote site. In order to make telesurgery practice realistic and secure, reliable transmission of medical videos over large distances is essential. However, telesurgery videos that are communicated remotely in real time are vulnerable to distortions in signals due to data compression and transmission. Depending on the system and its applications, visual content received by the surgeons differs in perceived quality, which may incur implications for the performance of telesurgery tasks. To rigorously study the assessment of the quality of telesurgery videos, we performed both qualitative and quantitative research, consisting of semi-structured interviews and video quality scoring with human subjects. Statistical analyses are conducted and results show that compression artifacts and transmission errors significantly affect the perceived quality; and the effects tend to depend on the specific surgical procedure, visual content, frame rate, and the degree of distortion. The findings of the study are readily applicable to improving telesurgery systems.en_US
dc.format.extent9990,en_US
dc.format.extent9999en_US
dc.publisherIEEEen_US
dc.relation.haspart7927709.pdfen_US
dc.titleStudy of Video Quality Assessment for Telesurgeryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.journal.volume5en_US
Appears in Collections:2017

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
7927709.pdf9.12 MBAdobe PDF
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLucie L&x00E9;v&x00EA;queen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei Zhangen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristine Cavaro-M&x00E9;narden_US
dc.contributor.authorPatrick Le Calleten_US
dc.contributor.authorHantao Liuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-06T07:24:21Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-06T07:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2704285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://localhost/handle/Hannan/166232-
dc.descriptionen_US
dc.description.abstractTelemedicine provides a transformative practice for access to and delivery of timely and high-quality healthcare in resource-poor settings. In a typical scenario of telesurgery, surgical tasks are performed with one surgeon situated at the patient's side and one expert surgeon from a remote site. In order to make telesurgery practice realistic and secure, reliable transmission of medical videos over large distances is essential. However, telesurgery videos that are communicated remotely in real time are vulnerable to distortions in signals due to data compression and transmission. Depending on the system and its applications, visual content received by the surgeons differs in perceived quality, which may incur implications for the performance of telesurgery tasks. To rigorously study the assessment of the quality of telesurgery videos, we performed both qualitative and quantitative research, consisting of semi-structured interviews and video quality scoring with human subjects. Statistical analyses are conducted and results show that compression artifacts and transmission errors significantly affect the perceived quality; and the effects tend to depend on the specific surgical procedure, visual content, frame rate, and the degree of distortion. The findings of the study are readily applicable to improving telesurgery systems.en_US
dc.format.extent9990,en_US
dc.format.extent9999en_US
dc.publisherIEEEen_US
dc.relation.haspart7927709.pdfen_US
dc.titleStudy of Video Quality Assessment for Telesurgeryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.journal.volume5en_US
Appears in Collections:2017

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
7927709.pdf9.12 MBAdobe PDF
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLucie L&x00E9;v&x00EA;queen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei Zhangen_US
dc.contributor.authorChristine Cavaro-M&x00E9;narden_US
dc.contributor.authorPatrick Le Calleten_US
dc.contributor.authorHantao Liuen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-06T07:24:21Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-06T07:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.other10.1109/ACCESS.2017.2704285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://localhost/handle/Hannan/166232-
dc.descriptionen_US
dc.description.abstractTelemedicine provides a transformative practice for access to and delivery of timely and high-quality healthcare in resource-poor settings. In a typical scenario of telesurgery, surgical tasks are performed with one surgeon situated at the patient's side and one expert surgeon from a remote site. In order to make telesurgery practice realistic and secure, reliable transmission of medical videos over large distances is essential. However, telesurgery videos that are communicated remotely in real time are vulnerable to distortions in signals due to data compression and transmission. Depending on the system and its applications, visual content received by the surgeons differs in perceived quality, which may incur implications for the performance of telesurgery tasks. To rigorously study the assessment of the quality of telesurgery videos, we performed both qualitative and quantitative research, consisting of semi-structured interviews and video quality scoring with human subjects. Statistical analyses are conducted and results show that compression artifacts and transmission errors significantly affect the perceived quality; and the effects tend to depend on the specific surgical procedure, visual content, frame rate, and the degree of distortion. The findings of the study are readily applicable to improving telesurgery systems.en_US
dc.format.extent9990,en_US
dc.format.extent9999en_US
dc.publisherIEEEen_US
dc.relation.haspart7927709.pdfen_US
dc.titleStudy of Video Quality Assessment for Telesurgeryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.journal.volume5en_US
Appears in Collections:2017

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
7927709.pdf9.12 MBAdobe PDF