Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/159824
Title: Gold Fingers: 3D Targets for Evaluating Capacitive Readers
Authors: Sunpreet S. Arora;Anil K. Jain;Nicholas G. Paulter
Year: 2017
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: With capacitive fingerprint readers being increasingly used for access control as well as for smartphone unlock and payments, there is a growing interest among metrology agencies (e.g., the National Institute of Standards and Technology) to develop standard artifacts (targets) and procedures for repeatable evaluation of capacitive readers. We present our design and fabrication procedures to create conductive 3D targets (gold fingers) for capacitive readers. Wearable 3D targets with known feature markings (e.g., fingerprint ridge flow and ridge spacing) are first fabricated using a high-resolution 3D printer. A sputter coating process is subsequently used to deposit a thin layer (~300 nm) of conductive materials (titanium and gold) on 3D printed targets. The wearable gold finger targets are used to evaluate a PIV-certified single-finger capacitive reader as well as small-area capacitive readers embedded in smartphones and access control terminals. In additional, we show that a simple procedure to create 3D printed spoofs with conductive carbon coating is able to successfully spoof a PIV-certified single-finger capacitive reader as well as a capacitive reader embedded in an access control terminal.
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/159824
volume: 12
issue: 9
More Information: 2067,
2077
Appears in Collections:2017

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
7903634.pdf7.19 MBAdobe PDF
Title: Gold Fingers: 3D Targets for Evaluating Capacitive Readers
Authors: Sunpreet S. Arora;Anil K. Jain;Nicholas G. Paulter
Year: 2017
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: With capacitive fingerprint readers being increasingly used for access control as well as for smartphone unlock and payments, there is a growing interest among metrology agencies (e.g., the National Institute of Standards and Technology) to develop standard artifacts (targets) and procedures for repeatable evaluation of capacitive readers. We present our design and fabrication procedures to create conductive 3D targets (gold fingers) for capacitive readers. Wearable 3D targets with known feature markings (e.g., fingerprint ridge flow and ridge spacing) are first fabricated using a high-resolution 3D printer. A sputter coating process is subsequently used to deposit a thin layer (~300 nm) of conductive materials (titanium and gold) on 3D printed targets. The wearable gold finger targets are used to evaluate a PIV-certified single-finger capacitive reader as well as small-area capacitive readers embedded in smartphones and access control terminals. In additional, we show that a simple procedure to create 3D printed spoofs with conductive carbon coating is able to successfully spoof a PIV-certified single-finger capacitive reader as well as a capacitive reader embedded in an access control terminal.
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/159824
volume: 12
issue: 9
More Information: 2067,
2077
Appears in Collections:2017

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
7903634.pdf7.19 MBAdobe PDF
Title: Gold Fingers: 3D Targets for Evaluating Capacitive Readers
Authors: Sunpreet S. Arora;Anil K. Jain;Nicholas G. Paulter
Year: 2017
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: With capacitive fingerprint readers being increasingly used for access control as well as for smartphone unlock and payments, there is a growing interest among metrology agencies (e.g., the National Institute of Standards and Technology) to develop standard artifacts (targets) and procedures for repeatable evaluation of capacitive readers. We present our design and fabrication procedures to create conductive 3D targets (gold fingers) for capacitive readers. Wearable 3D targets with known feature markings (e.g., fingerprint ridge flow and ridge spacing) are first fabricated using a high-resolution 3D printer. A sputter coating process is subsequently used to deposit a thin layer (~300 nm) of conductive materials (titanium and gold) on 3D printed targets. The wearable gold finger targets are used to evaluate a PIV-certified single-finger capacitive reader as well as small-area capacitive readers embedded in smartphones and access control terminals. In additional, we show that a simple procedure to create 3D printed spoofs with conductive carbon coating is able to successfully spoof a PIV-certified single-finger capacitive reader as well as a capacitive reader embedded in an access control terminal.
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/159824
volume: 12
issue: 9
More Information: 2067,
2077
Appears in Collections:2017

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
7903634.pdf7.19 MBAdobe PDF