Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost:80/handle/Hannan/720139
Title: How Broad Are Thematic Roles? Evidence From Structural Priming
subject: Linguistics and Language;Experimental and Cognitive Psychology;Cognitive Neuroscience;Developmental and Educational Psychology;Language and Linguistics
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Description: Verbs that are similar in meaning tend to occur in the same syntactic structures. For example, give and hand, which denote transfer of possession, both appear in the prepositional-object construction: “The child gave / handed the ball to the dog.” We can call the child a “giver” in one case and a “hander” in the other, or we can refer to her more generally as the agent, or doer of the action. Similarly, the dog can be called the recipient, and the ball, the theme. These generalized notions of agent, recipient, and theme are known as thematic roles. An important theoretical question for linguists and psycholinguists is what the set of thematic roles is. Are there a small number of very broad roles, perhaps with each one mapping onto a single canonical syntactic position? Or are there many distinct roles, several mapping to the same syntactic position but conveying subtly different meanings? We investigate this question across eleven structural priming experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk (total N=2,914), asking whether speakers treat the thematic roles recipient and destination (i.e., location or spatial goal) as interchangeable, suggesting the broad role of goal, or distinct, suggesting two separate roles. To do so, we look for priming between dative sentences (e.g., “The man gave the ball to the dog”), which have a recipient role (dog), and locative sentences (e.g., “The man loaded hay onto the wagon”), which instead have a destination role (wagon). Our pattern of findings confirms that thematic role mappings can be primed independent of syntactic structure, lexical content, and animacy. However, we find that this priming does not extend from destinations to recipients (or vice versa), providing evidence that these two roles are distinct.
Psychology
Accepted Manuscript
URI: http://localhost:80/handle/Hannan/720139
More Information: Ziegler, Jayden, and Jesse Snedeker. 2018. “How Broad Are Thematic Roles? Evidence from Structural Priming.” Cognition 179 (October): 221–40.
0010-0277
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:39666443
10.1016/j.cognition.2018.06.019
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: How Broad Are Thematic Roles? Evidence From Structural Priming
subject: Linguistics and Language;Experimental and Cognitive Psychology;Cognitive Neuroscience;Developmental and Educational Psychology;Language and Linguistics
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Description: Verbs that are similar in meaning tend to occur in the same syntactic structures. For example, give and hand, which denote transfer of possession, both appear in the prepositional-object construction: “The child gave / handed the ball to the dog.” We can call the child a “giver” in one case and a “hander” in the other, or we can refer to her more generally as the agent, or doer of the action. Similarly, the dog can be called the recipient, and the ball, the theme. These generalized notions of agent, recipient, and theme are known as thematic roles. An important theoretical question for linguists and psycholinguists is what the set of thematic roles is. Are there a small number of very broad roles, perhaps with each one mapping onto a single canonical syntactic position? Or are there many distinct roles, several mapping to the same syntactic position but conveying subtly different meanings? We investigate this question across eleven structural priming experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk (total N=2,914), asking whether speakers treat the thematic roles recipient and destination (i.e., location or spatial goal) as interchangeable, suggesting the broad role of goal, or distinct, suggesting two separate roles. To do so, we look for priming between dative sentences (e.g., “The man gave the ball to the dog”), which have a recipient role (dog), and locative sentences (e.g., “The man loaded hay onto the wagon”), which instead have a destination role (wagon). Our pattern of findings confirms that thematic role mappings can be primed independent of syntactic structure, lexical content, and animacy. However, we find that this priming does not extend from destinations to recipients (or vice versa), providing evidence that these two roles are distinct.
Psychology
Accepted Manuscript
URI: http://localhost:80/handle/Hannan/720139
More Information: Ziegler, Jayden, and Jesse Snedeker. 2018. “How Broad Are Thematic Roles? Evidence from Structural Priming.” Cognition 179 (October): 221–40.
0010-0277
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:39666443
10.1016/j.cognition.2018.06.019
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: How Broad Are Thematic Roles? Evidence From Structural Priming
subject: Linguistics and Language;Experimental and Cognitive Psychology;Cognitive Neuroscience;Developmental and Educational Psychology;Language and Linguistics
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Description: Verbs that are similar in meaning tend to occur in the same syntactic structures. For example, give and hand, which denote transfer of possession, both appear in the prepositional-object construction: “The child gave / handed the ball to the dog.” We can call the child a “giver” in one case and a “hander” in the other, or we can refer to her more generally as the agent, or doer of the action. Similarly, the dog can be called the recipient, and the ball, the theme. These generalized notions of agent, recipient, and theme are known as thematic roles. An important theoretical question for linguists and psycholinguists is what the set of thematic roles is. Are there a small number of very broad roles, perhaps with each one mapping onto a single canonical syntactic position? Or are there many distinct roles, several mapping to the same syntactic position but conveying subtly different meanings? We investigate this question across eleven structural priming experiments on Amazon Mechanical Turk (total N=2,914), asking whether speakers treat the thematic roles recipient and destination (i.e., location or spatial goal) as interchangeable, suggesting the broad role of goal, or distinct, suggesting two separate roles. To do so, we look for priming between dative sentences (e.g., “The man gave the ball to the dog”), which have a recipient role (dog), and locative sentences (e.g., “The man loaded hay onto the wagon”), which instead have a destination role (wagon). Our pattern of findings confirms that thematic role mappings can be primed independent of syntactic structure, lexical content, and animacy. However, we find that this priming does not extend from destinations to recipients (or vice versa), providing evidence that these two roles are distinct.
Psychology
Accepted Manuscript
URI: http://localhost:80/handle/Hannan/720139
More Information: Ziegler, Jayden, and Jesse Snedeker. 2018. “How Broad Are Thematic Roles? Evidence from Structural Priming.” Cognition 179 (October): 221–40.
0010-0277
http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:39666443
10.1016/j.cognition.2018.06.019
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.