Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720116
Title: The relationship of staff nurse job satisfaction and head nurse management style
Authors: Rowles, Connie J.
subject: Nursing services -- Administration.;Nurse administrators.;Nurses -- Job stress.;Nurses -- Job satisfaction.
Description: America's health care industry is in a state of crisis. Nursing administrators are in the position to facilitate change in institutions. One aspect of nursing which has remained constant is high turnover rates. The high turnover rates have been linked to job dissatisfaction. One method of reducing turnover is to provide greater job satisfaction to staff nurses. Job satisfaction has been connected with management style (Lucas, 1991; Price & Mueller, 1981; Volk & Lucas, 1991).This study described the impact of head nurse management style on staff nurse job satisfaction. Likert's (1967) System 4 management theory was utilized as the framework in the study. All staff nurses and head nurses from three Central Indiana hospitals were given the opportunity to participate in the study. Participants completed two questionnaires, one from Price and Mueller's (1981) work on turnover to determine job satisfaction and one from Likert and Likert's (1976) work to determine management style.Data analysis was conducted to describe any variations between staff nurse experience of head nurse management style and staff nurse job satisfaction. Differences between head nurse and staff nurse description of management style were also examined. There were no identified risks as participation was voluntary and did not affect the employment status of any individual.Results of the study demonstrated agreement with previous research findings. When management style is closer to participative (system 4), greater job satisfaction is expressed. Recommendations are to provide management training and training in communication and self-awareness for head nurses, and to form unit based committees designed to achieve greater staff input in decisions affecting the unit functioning.Benefits of the study include identification of the management style which leads to improved staff nurse job satisfaction. Equipping nurse administrators with information regarding desirable management style to employ for staff nurses to experience greater job satisfaction, and training present managers in that management style are also possible benefits from the study.
School of Nursing
Thesis (M.S.)
URI: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720116
http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184910
More Information: LD2489.Z78 1994 .M67
Appears in Collections:Ball State Theses and Dissertations

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: The relationship of staff nurse job satisfaction and head nurse management style
Authors: Rowles, Connie J.
subject: Nursing services -- Administration.;Nurse administrators.;Nurses -- Job stress.;Nurses -- Job satisfaction.
Description: America's health care industry is in a state of crisis. Nursing administrators are in the position to facilitate change in institutions. One aspect of nursing which has remained constant is high turnover rates. The high turnover rates have been linked to job dissatisfaction. One method of reducing turnover is to provide greater job satisfaction to staff nurses. Job satisfaction has been connected with management style (Lucas, 1991; Price & Mueller, 1981; Volk & Lucas, 1991).This study described the impact of head nurse management style on staff nurse job satisfaction. Likert's (1967) System 4 management theory was utilized as the framework in the study. All staff nurses and head nurses from three Central Indiana hospitals were given the opportunity to participate in the study. Participants completed two questionnaires, one from Price and Mueller's (1981) work on turnover to determine job satisfaction and one from Likert and Likert's (1976) work to determine management style.Data analysis was conducted to describe any variations between staff nurse experience of head nurse management style and staff nurse job satisfaction. Differences between head nurse and staff nurse description of management style were also examined. There were no identified risks as participation was voluntary and did not affect the employment status of any individual.Results of the study demonstrated agreement with previous research findings. When management style is closer to participative (system 4), greater job satisfaction is expressed. Recommendations are to provide management training and training in communication and self-awareness for head nurses, and to form unit based committees designed to achieve greater staff input in decisions affecting the unit functioning.Benefits of the study include identification of the management style which leads to improved staff nurse job satisfaction. Equipping nurse administrators with information regarding desirable management style to employ for staff nurses to experience greater job satisfaction, and training present managers in that management style are also possible benefits from the study.
School of Nursing
Thesis (M.S.)
URI: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720116
http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184910
More Information: LD2489.Z78 1994 .M67
Appears in Collections:Ball State Theses and Dissertations

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: The relationship of staff nurse job satisfaction and head nurse management style
Authors: Rowles, Connie J.
subject: Nursing services -- Administration.;Nurse administrators.;Nurses -- Job stress.;Nurses -- Job satisfaction.
Description: America's health care industry is in a state of crisis. Nursing administrators are in the position to facilitate change in institutions. One aspect of nursing which has remained constant is high turnover rates. The high turnover rates have been linked to job dissatisfaction. One method of reducing turnover is to provide greater job satisfaction to staff nurses. Job satisfaction has been connected with management style (Lucas, 1991; Price & Mueller, 1981; Volk & Lucas, 1991).This study described the impact of head nurse management style on staff nurse job satisfaction. Likert's (1967) System 4 management theory was utilized as the framework in the study. All staff nurses and head nurses from three Central Indiana hospitals were given the opportunity to participate in the study. Participants completed two questionnaires, one from Price and Mueller's (1981) work on turnover to determine job satisfaction and one from Likert and Likert's (1976) work to determine management style.Data analysis was conducted to describe any variations between staff nurse experience of head nurse management style and staff nurse job satisfaction. Differences between head nurse and staff nurse description of management style were also examined. There were no identified risks as participation was voluntary and did not affect the employment status of any individual.Results of the study demonstrated agreement with previous research findings. When management style is closer to participative (system 4), greater job satisfaction is expressed. Recommendations are to provide management training and training in communication and self-awareness for head nurses, and to form unit based committees designed to achieve greater staff input in decisions affecting the unit functioning.Benefits of the study include identification of the management style which leads to improved staff nurse job satisfaction. Equipping nurse administrators with information regarding desirable management style to employ for staff nurses to experience greater job satisfaction, and training present managers in that management style are also possible benefits from the study.
School of Nursing
Thesis (M.S.)
URI: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720116
http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184910
More Information: LD2489.Z78 1994 .M67
Appears in Collections:Ball State Theses and Dissertations

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.