Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720115
Title: Power output prediction determined from vertical jump and reach test for male and female university athletes
Authors: Bahamonde, Rafael E.
subject: Jumping -- Ability testing.;Human mechanics.;Arm -- Mechanical properties.
Description: The purpose of this study was to devise a simple mechanical power formula for both peak and average power using a countermovement jump and reach test for both college male and female athletes. Forty-nine female and 69 male athletes were measured for height, weight, thigh circumference, thigh skinfold, upper leg length, and lower leg length. The athletes performed a countermovement jump and reach test off of a force platform. A Vertec jumping apparatus was used to measure vertical jump height and the force platform was used to acquire force/time data to determine actual peak and average power output. Eight anthropometric measurements, vertical jump height, and gender were the variables presented to develop the equations. A stepwise multiple regression statistical procedure was used to develop the prediction equations. Vertical jump height, mass, and body height were the significant (p<.05) variables loaded into both peak and average mechanical power prediction equations. Gender was not significant (p>.05) and, therefore, not loaded into either equation. Predicted peak power and actual peak power values were 4,707 t 1,511 and 4,687 ± 1,612 watts, respectively. Predicted averagepower and actual average power values were 2,547 ± 760 and 2,463 ± 753 watts, respectively. The following best model regression-derived equations produced R2 values of .91 for peak power and .82 for average power:Peak Power (W) = 78.47 • VJ (cm) + 60.57 • Mass (kg) - 15.31 • Ht (cm) - 1,308 Average Power (W) = 41.41 • VJ (cm) + 31.18 • Mass (kg) - 13.86 • Ht (cm) + 431 Results of this study conclude that the two regression equations are good predictors of peak and average mechanical power output.
School of Physical Education
Thesis (M.S.)
URI: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720115
http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184946
More Information: LD2489.Z78 1994 .J64
Appears in Collections:Ball State Theses and Dissertations

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Power output prediction determined from vertical jump and reach test for male and female university athletes
Authors: Bahamonde, Rafael E.
subject: Jumping -- Ability testing.;Human mechanics.;Arm -- Mechanical properties.
Description: The purpose of this study was to devise a simple mechanical power formula for both peak and average power using a countermovement jump and reach test for both college male and female athletes. Forty-nine female and 69 male athletes were measured for height, weight, thigh circumference, thigh skinfold, upper leg length, and lower leg length. The athletes performed a countermovement jump and reach test off of a force platform. A Vertec jumping apparatus was used to measure vertical jump height and the force platform was used to acquire force/time data to determine actual peak and average power output. Eight anthropometric measurements, vertical jump height, and gender were the variables presented to develop the equations. A stepwise multiple regression statistical procedure was used to develop the prediction equations. Vertical jump height, mass, and body height were the significant (p<.05) variables loaded into both peak and average mechanical power prediction equations. Gender was not significant (p>.05) and, therefore, not loaded into either equation. Predicted peak power and actual peak power values were 4,707 t 1,511 and 4,687 ± 1,612 watts, respectively. Predicted averagepower and actual average power values were 2,547 ± 760 and 2,463 ± 753 watts, respectively. The following best model regression-derived equations produced R2 values of .91 for peak power and .82 for average power:Peak Power (W) = 78.47 • VJ (cm) + 60.57 • Mass (kg) - 15.31 • Ht (cm) - 1,308 Average Power (W) = 41.41 • VJ (cm) + 31.18 • Mass (kg) - 13.86 • Ht (cm) + 431 Results of this study conclude that the two regression equations are good predictors of peak and average mechanical power output.
School of Physical Education
Thesis (M.S.)
URI: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720115
http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184946
More Information: LD2489.Z78 1994 .J64
Appears in Collections:Ball State Theses and Dissertations

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Power output prediction determined from vertical jump and reach test for male and female university athletes
Authors: Bahamonde, Rafael E.
subject: Jumping -- Ability testing.;Human mechanics.;Arm -- Mechanical properties.
Description: The purpose of this study was to devise a simple mechanical power formula for both peak and average power using a countermovement jump and reach test for both college male and female athletes. Forty-nine female and 69 male athletes were measured for height, weight, thigh circumference, thigh skinfold, upper leg length, and lower leg length. The athletes performed a countermovement jump and reach test off of a force platform. A Vertec jumping apparatus was used to measure vertical jump height and the force platform was used to acquire force/time data to determine actual peak and average power output. Eight anthropometric measurements, vertical jump height, and gender were the variables presented to develop the equations. A stepwise multiple regression statistical procedure was used to develop the prediction equations. Vertical jump height, mass, and body height were the significant (p<.05) variables loaded into both peak and average mechanical power prediction equations. Gender was not significant (p>.05) and, therefore, not loaded into either equation. Predicted peak power and actual peak power values were 4,707 t 1,511 and 4,687 ± 1,612 watts, respectively. Predicted averagepower and actual average power values were 2,547 ± 760 and 2,463 ± 753 watts, respectively. The following best model regression-derived equations produced R2 values of .91 for peak power and .82 for average power:Peak Power (W) = 78.47 • VJ (cm) + 60.57 • Mass (kg) - 15.31 • Ht (cm) - 1,308 Average Power (W) = 41.41 • VJ (cm) + 31.18 • Mass (kg) - 13.86 • Ht (cm) + 431 Results of this study conclude that the two regression equations are good predictors of peak and average mechanical power output.
School of Physical Education
Thesis (M.S.)
URI: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/Hannan/720115
http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/handle/184946
More Information: LD2489.Z78 1994 .J64
Appears in Collections:Ball State Theses and Dissertations

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.