Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/605111
Title: Optofluidic Switching of Nanoparticles Based on a WDM Tree Splitter
Authors: Wenxiang Jiao;Guanghui Wang;Zhoufeng Ying;Zhiwen Kang;Tianyu Sun;Ningmu Zou;Ho-pui Ho;Xuping Zhang
subject: Nanofluidics|wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)|Optical trapping|Silicon photonics
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: We demonstrate a silicon-based wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) tree splitter for optofluidic switching of nanoparticles in a lab-on-a-chip or nanofluidic system. The gradient force and scattering force induced by the evanescent field can, respectively, lead to trapping and transportation of colloidal polystyrene (PS) spheres directly above the waveguide. Guiding of PS into any designated branch within a cascaded tree splitter is achieved by switching of the excitation wavelength. As compared to that based on microrings, an optimized design of the reported tree splitter approach offers a number of advantages in terms of device compactness, wavelength tolerance, response speed, and trap stability, while maintaining the inherent low-loss and low-power performance features of WDM splitters. A network of such splitters can readily lead to a platform for high-throughput and large-scale particle manipulation in nanofluidic systems.
Description: 
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/155278
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/605111
ISSN: 1943-0655
volume: 8
issue: 3
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
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Title: Optofluidic Switching of Nanoparticles Based on a WDM Tree Splitter
Authors: Wenxiang Jiao;Guanghui Wang;Zhoufeng Ying;Zhiwen Kang;Tianyu Sun;Ningmu Zou;Ho-pui Ho;Xuping Zhang
subject: Nanofluidics|wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)|Optical trapping|Silicon photonics
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: We demonstrate a silicon-based wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) tree splitter for optofluidic switching of nanoparticles in a lab-on-a-chip or nanofluidic system. The gradient force and scattering force induced by the evanescent field can, respectively, lead to trapping and transportation of colloidal polystyrene (PS) spheres directly above the waveguide. Guiding of PS into any designated branch within a cascaded tree splitter is achieved by switching of the excitation wavelength. As compared to that based on microrings, an optimized design of the reported tree splitter approach offers a number of advantages in terms of device compactness, wavelength tolerance, response speed, and trap stability, while maintaining the inherent low-loss and low-power performance features of WDM splitters. A network of such splitters can readily lead to a platform for high-throughput and large-scale particle manipulation in nanofluidic systems.
Description: 
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/155278
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/605111
ISSN: 1943-0655
volume: 8
issue: 3
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
7470545.pdf1.27 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Preview File
Title: Optofluidic Switching of Nanoparticles Based on a WDM Tree Splitter
Authors: Wenxiang Jiao;Guanghui Wang;Zhoufeng Ying;Zhiwen Kang;Tianyu Sun;Ningmu Zou;Ho-pui Ho;Xuping Zhang
subject: Nanofluidics|wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)|Optical trapping|Silicon photonics
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: We demonstrate a silicon-based wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) tree splitter for optofluidic switching of nanoparticles in a lab-on-a-chip or nanofluidic system. The gradient force and scattering force induced by the evanescent field can, respectively, lead to trapping and transportation of colloidal polystyrene (PS) spheres directly above the waveguide. Guiding of PS into any designated branch within a cascaded tree splitter is achieved by switching of the excitation wavelength. As compared to that based on microrings, an optimized design of the reported tree splitter approach offers a number of advantages in terms of device compactness, wavelength tolerance, response speed, and trap stability, while maintaining the inherent low-loss and low-power performance features of WDM splitters. A network of such splitters can readily lead to a platform for high-throughput and large-scale particle manipulation in nanofluidic systems.
Description: 
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/155278
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/605111
ISSN: 1943-0655
volume: 8
issue: 3
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
7470545.pdf1.27 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Preview File