Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/603382
Title: Layered-Division-Multiplexing: Theory and Practice
Authors: Liang Zhang;Wei Li;Yiyan Wu;Xianbin Wang;Sung-Ik Park;Heung Mook Kim;Jae-Young Lee;Pablo Angueira;Jon Montalban
subject: layered-division-multiplexing|OFDM|Cloud transmission|UHDTV|successive signal cancellation|mobile service|multiple-layer transmission|LDM|MIMO|SISO|SIMO|MISO|channel estimation
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: As the next generation digital TV (DTV) standard, the ATSC 3.0 system is developed to provide significant improvements on the spectrum efficiency, the service reliability, the system flexibility, and system forward compatibility. One of the top-priority requirements for the ATSC 3.0 is the capability to deliver reliable mobile TV services to a large variety of mobile and indoor devices. Layered-division-multiplexing (LDM) is a physical-layer non-orthogonal-multiplexing technology to efficiently deliver multiple services with different robustness and throughputs in one TV channel. A two-layer LDM structure is accepted by ATSC 3.0 as a baseline physical-layer technology. This LDM system is capable of delivering robust high-definition (HD) mobile TV and ultra-HDTV services in one 6 MHz channel, with a higher spectrum efficiency than the traditional time/frequency-division-multiplexing (T/FDM)-based DTV systems. This paper presents a detailed overview on the LDM technology, and its application in the ATSC 3.0 systems. First, the fundamental advantages of the LDM over the traditional TDM/FDM systems are analyzed from information theory point of view. The performance advantages of the LDM are then confirmed by extensive simulations of the ATSC 3.0 system. It is shown that, LDM can realize the potential gain offered by superposition coding over the TDM/FDM systems, by properly configuring the transmission power, channel coding, and modulation, and using different multiple antenna technologies in the multiple layers. Next, the efficient implementation of LDM in the ATSC 3.0 system is presented to show that the performance advantages of the LDM are obtained with small additional complexity. This is achieved by carefully aligning the transmission signal structure and the signal processing chains in the multiple layers. Finally, we show that the LDM can be further integrated with different multiple antenna technologies to achieve further transmission capacity.
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/147897
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/603382
ISSN: 0018-9316
1557-9611
volume: 62
issue: 1
Appears in Collections:2016

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7378924.pdf2.09 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
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Title: Layered-Division-Multiplexing: Theory and Practice
Authors: Liang Zhang;Wei Li;Yiyan Wu;Xianbin Wang;Sung-Ik Park;Heung Mook Kim;Jae-Young Lee;Pablo Angueira;Jon Montalban
subject: layered-division-multiplexing|OFDM|Cloud transmission|UHDTV|successive signal cancellation|mobile service|multiple-layer transmission|LDM|MIMO|SISO|SIMO|MISO|channel estimation
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: As the next generation digital TV (DTV) standard, the ATSC 3.0 system is developed to provide significant improvements on the spectrum efficiency, the service reliability, the system flexibility, and system forward compatibility. One of the top-priority requirements for the ATSC 3.0 is the capability to deliver reliable mobile TV services to a large variety of mobile and indoor devices. Layered-division-multiplexing (LDM) is a physical-layer non-orthogonal-multiplexing technology to efficiently deliver multiple services with different robustness and throughputs in one TV channel. A two-layer LDM structure is accepted by ATSC 3.0 as a baseline physical-layer technology. This LDM system is capable of delivering robust high-definition (HD) mobile TV and ultra-HDTV services in one 6 MHz channel, with a higher spectrum efficiency than the traditional time/frequency-division-multiplexing (T/FDM)-based DTV systems. This paper presents a detailed overview on the LDM technology, and its application in the ATSC 3.0 systems. First, the fundamental advantages of the LDM over the traditional TDM/FDM systems are analyzed from information theory point of view. The performance advantages of the LDM are then confirmed by extensive simulations of the ATSC 3.0 system. It is shown that, LDM can realize the potential gain offered by superposition coding over the TDM/FDM systems, by properly configuring the transmission power, channel coding, and modulation, and using different multiple antenna technologies in the multiple layers. Next, the efficient implementation of LDM in the ATSC 3.0 system is presented to show that the performance advantages of the LDM are obtained with small additional complexity. This is achieved by carefully aligning the transmission signal structure and the signal processing chains in the multiple layers. Finally, we show that the LDM can be further integrated with different multiple antenna technologies to achieve further transmission capacity.
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/147897
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/603382
ISSN: 0018-9316
1557-9611
volume: 62
issue: 1
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
7378924.pdf2.09 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Preview File
Title: Layered-Division-Multiplexing: Theory and Practice
Authors: Liang Zhang;Wei Li;Yiyan Wu;Xianbin Wang;Sung-Ik Park;Heung Mook Kim;Jae-Young Lee;Pablo Angueira;Jon Montalban
subject: layered-division-multiplexing|OFDM|Cloud transmission|UHDTV|successive signal cancellation|mobile service|multiple-layer transmission|LDM|MIMO|SISO|SIMO|MISO|channel estimation
Year: 2016
Publisher: IEEE
Abstract: As the next generation digital TV (DTV) standard, the ATSC 3.0 system is developed to provide significant improvements on the spectrum efficiency, the service reliability, the system flexibility, and system forward compatibility. One of the top-priority requirements for the ATSC 3.0 is the capability to deliver reliable mobile TV services to a large variety of mobile and indoor devices. Layered-division-multiplexing (LDM) is a physical-layer non-orthogonal-multiplexing technology to efficiently deliver multiple services with different robustness and throughputs in one TV channel. A two-layer LDM structure is accepted by ATSC 3.0 as a baseline physical-layer technology. This LDM system is capable of delivering robust high-definition (HD) mobile TV and ultra-HDTV services in one 6 MHz channel, with a higher spectrum efficiency than the traditional time/frequency-division-multiplexing (T/FDM)-based DTV systems. This paper presents a detailed overview on the LDM technology, and its application in the ATSC 3.0 systems. First, the fundamental advantages of the LDM over the traditional TDM/FDM systems are analyzed from information theory point of view. The performance advantages of the LDM are then confirmed by extensive simulations of the ATSC 3.0 system. It is shown that, LDM can realize the potential gain offered by superposition coding over the TDM/FDM systems, by properly configuring the transmission power, channel coding, and modulation, and using different multiple antenna technologies in the multiple layers. Next, the efficient implementation of LDM in the ATSC 3.0 system is presented to show that the performance advantages of the LDM are obtained with small additional complexity. This is achieved by carefully aligning the transmission signal structure and the signal processing chains in the multiple layers. Finally, we show that the LDM can be further integrated with different multiple antenna technologies to achieve further transmission capacity.
URI: http://localhost/handle/Hannan/147897
http://localhost/handle/Hannan/603382
ISSN: 0018-9316
1557-9611
volume: 62
issue: 1
Appears in Collections:2016

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
7378924.pdf2.09 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
Preview File