Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/2123/20893
Title: Commerce, the Capital, and Community: Trade ceramics, settlement patterns and continuity throughout the demise of Angkor
subject: settlement patterns;trade ceramics;demise;Angkor;Cambodia
Publisher: University of Sydney
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Department of Archaeology
Description: The decline of Angkor is a poorly understood phenomenon for which the conventional narrative, based solely on textual sources, is problematic. While the debate continues over the various environmental, political, cultural and economic factors, the date range for the end of Angkor and the associated population movements has yet to be comprehensively identified archaeologically. A conundrum is that a growing corpus of material evidence from ceramic scatters implies a significant post-Angkorian occupation. The issue is that while the distribution and relative scarcity of imported Chinese ceramics from Angkorian period (9th to 14-15th century) contexts (<5% of the total assemblage) suggests they were a luxury item at that time, the subsequent observations of French ethnographers attest to their abundance in late 19th-century Cambodia. At that time Chinese wares were in everyday use by the general populace as part of the domestic assemblage, suggesting a marked change in their role and significance. Therefore at some time between the 14th and the 19th century the meaning of the spatial signature of Chinese trade wares changed. Through excavation and archaeological survey, this research employs a multi-scalar approach to analyse the various phenomena which relate to the demise of Greater Angkor. Starting with individual domestic contexts, it then examines the massive infrastructure of the built environment and finishes with the occupation signature across the entire landscape in which the spatial distribution of datable ceramic assemblages is used to model changing settlement patterns in the late and post-Angkorian periods. From 2012 to 2015 the Greater Angkor Project conducted the first large-scale systematic survey of the habitation mounds throughout the settlement extending from the urban core to the periphery. Each site within the study area was surveyed for surface ceramics and diagnostic pieces were collected, analysed and catalogued. While the great majority of material is Khmer, trade wares from China, Japan, Thailand and Vietnam function as crucial temporal markers, especially for the post-14th century period when all known Khmer kilns had ceased production. This thesis presents the preliminary results of this study from the 12th to 19th centuries and explores the impact of changing use regimes on the interpretation of settlement patterns.
Access is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/20893
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/20893
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Commerce, the Capital, and Community: Trade ceramics, settlement patterns and continuity throughout the demise of Angkor
subject: settlement patterns;trade ceramics;demise;Angkor;Cambodia
Publisher: University of Sydney
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Department of Archaeology
Description: The decline of Angkor is a poorly understood phenomenon for which the conventional narrative, based solely on textual sources, is problematic. While the debate continues over the various environmental, political, cultural and economic factors, the date range for the end of Angkor and the associated population movements has yet to be comprehensively identified archaeologically. A conundrum is that a growing corpus of material evidence from ceramic scatters implies a significant post-Angkorian occupation. The issue is that while the distribution and relative scarcity of imported Chinese ceramics from Angkorian period (9th to 14-15th century) contexts (<5% of the total assemblage) suggests they were a luxury item at that time, the subsequent observations of French ethnographers attest to their abundance in late 19th-century Cambodia. At that time Chinese wares were in everyday use by the general populace as part of the domestic assemblage, suggesting a marked change in their role and significance. Therefore at some time between the 14th and the 19th century the meaning of the spatial signature of Chinese trade wares changed. Through excavation and archaeological survey, this research employs a multi-scalar approach to analyse the various phenomena which relate to the demise of Greater Angkor. Starting with individual domestic contexts, it then examines the massive infrastructure of the built environment and finishes with the occupation signature across the entire landscape in which the spatial distribution of datable ceramic assemblages is used to model changing settlement patterns in the late and post-Angkorian periods. From 2012 to 2015 the Greater Angkor Project conducted the first large-scale systematic survey of the habitation mounds throughout the settlement extending from the urban core to the periphery. Each site within the study area was surveyed for surface ceramics and diagnostic pieces were collected, analysed and catalogued. While the great majority of material is Khmer, trade wares from China, Japan, Thailand and Vietnam function as crucial temporal markers, especially for the post-14th century period when all known Khmer kilns had ceased production. This thesis presents the preliminary results of this study from the 12th to 19th centuries and explores the impact of changing use regimes on the interpretation of settlement patterns.
Access is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/20893
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/20893
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Commerce, the Capital, and Community: Trade ceramics, settlement patterns and continuity throughout the demise of Angkor
subject: settlement patterns;trade ceramics;demise;Angkor;Cambodia
Publisher: University of Sydney
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Department of Archaeology
Description: The decline of Angkor is a poorly understood phenomenon for which the conventional narrative, based solely on textual sources, is problematic. While the debate continues over the various environmental, political, cultural and economic factors, the date range for the end of Angkor and the associated population movements has yet to be comprehensively identified archaeologically. A conundrum is that a growing corpus of material evidence from ceramic scatters implies a significant post-Angkorian occupation. The issue is that while the distribution and relative scarcity of imported Chinese ceramics from Angkorian period (9th to 14-15th century) contexts (<5% of the total assemblage) suggests they were a luxury item at that time, the subsequent observations of French ethnographers attest to their abundance in late 19th-century Cambodia. At that time Chinese wares were in everyday use by the general populace as part of the domestic assemblage, suggesting a marked change in their role and significance. Therefore at some time between the 14th and the 19th century the meaning of the spatial signature of Chinese trade wares changed. Through excavation and archaeological survey, this research employs a multi-scalar approach to analyse the various phenomena which relate to the demise of Greater Angkor. Starting with individual domestic contexts, it then examines the massive infrastructure of the built environment and finishes with the occupation signature across the entire landscape in which the spatial distribution of datable ceramic assemblages is used to model changing settlement patterns in the late and post-Angkorian periods. From 2012 to 2015 the Greater Angkor Project conducted the first large-scale systematic survey of the habitation mounds throughout the settlement extending from the urban core to the periphery. Each site within the study area was surveyed for surface ceramics and diagnostic pieces were collected, analysed and catalogued. While the great majority of material is Khmer, trade wares from China, Japan, Thailand and Vietnam function as crucial temporal markers, especially for the post-14th century period when all known Khmer kilns had ceased production. This thesis presents the preliminary results of this study from the 12th to 19th centuries and explores the impact of changing use regimes on the interpretation of settlement patterns.
Access is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/20893
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/20893
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.