Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/2123/13604
Title: Research on the Structural Decomposition Analysis of Global Energy And Global Carbon Footprints
subject: marginal coefficient;Structural Decomposition Analysis;global energy footprint;global carbon emissions
Publisher: University of Sydney
School of Physics
Description: Greenhouse gas emissions increased by 10.8 Gigagram (Gg) CO2 equivalent in 1990−2010. Significant attention has been dedicated to the increase in emission transfers due to international trade. However, questions remain unanswered about which key sectors are stimulating the increase of CO2 emissions and whether changes in trade conditions have affected global emissions. To address the issue of increased emission transfers due to international trade, I used input-output tables (IOTs) in constant prices extended with CO2 emissions to examine the development of China. I calculated marginal coefficients – in monetary and CO2 terms – that capture the additional (new) technology installed after that year. My work provides a first overview of the magnitude and distribution of these coefficients in recent years across China’s rapidly growing economy for which marginal coefficients could be expected to differ greatly from average coefficients and are responsible for the substantial increase in CO2 emissions. To answer the second question regarding which industries and trade conditions are stimulating the increase in CO2 emissions, I first explore the countries and sectors recording an increase or decrease in energy footprints during the decades from 1990-2010. I then highlight the effect of international outsourcing of energy-intensive production processes by decomposing the structural and spatial change in energy footprints. This energy data is then further converted to CO2 emission data to disintegrate total CO2 emissions for each country into contributions from various driving forces acting on the domestic economy and international trade. The results reveal that consumption is outpacing efficiency by accelerating energy consumption and CO2 emissions, and that a world-wide shifting of energy-intensive and emissions-intensive production across borders has happened.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/13604
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13604
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Research on the Structural Decomposition Analysis of Global Energy And Global Carbon Footprints
subject: marginal coefficient;Structural Decomposition Analysis;global energy footprint;global carbon emissions
Publisher: University of Sydney
School of Physics
Description: Greenhouse gas emissions increased by 10.8 Gigagram (Gg) CO2 equivalent in 1990−2010. Significant attention has been dedicated to the increase in emission transfers due to international trade. However, questions remain unanswered about which key sectors are stimulating the increase of CO2 emissions and whether changes in trade conditions have affected global emissions. To address the issue of increased emission transfers due to international trade, I used input-output tables (IOTs) in constant prices extended with CO2 emissions to examine the development of China. I calculated marginal coefficients – in monetary and CO2 terms – that capture the additional (new) technology installed after that year. My work provides a first overview of the magnitude and distribution of these coefficients in recent years across China’s rapidly growing economy for which marginal coefficients could be expected to differ greatly from average coefficients and are responsible for the substantial increase in CO2 emissions. To answer the second question regarding which industries and trade conditions are stimulating the increase in CO2 emissions, I first explore the countries and sectors recording an increase or decrease in energy footprints during the decades from 1990-2010. I then highlight the effect of international outsourcing of energy-intensive production processes by decomposing the structural and spatial change in energy footprints. This energy data is then further converted to CO2 emission data to disintegrate total CO2 emissions for each country into contributions from various driving forces acting on the domestic economy and international trade. The results reveal that consumption is outpacing efficiency by accelerating energy consumption and CO2 emissions, and that a world-wide shifting of energy-intensive and emissions-intensive production across borders has happened.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/13604
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13604
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Research on the Structural Decomposition Analysis of Global Energy And Global Carbon Footprints
subject: marginal coefficient;Structural Decomposition Analysis;global energy footprint;global carbon emissions
Publisher: University of Sydney
School of Physics
Description: Greenhouse gas emissions increased by 10.8 Gigagram (Gg) CO2 equivalent in 1990−2010. Significant attention has been dedicated to the increase in emission transfers due to international trade. However, questions remain unanswered about which key sectors are stimulating the increase of CO2 emissions and whether changes in trade conditions have affected global emissions. To address the issue of increased emission transfers due to international trade, I used input-output tables (IOTs) in constant prices extended with CO2 emissions to examine the development of China. I calculated marginal coefficients – in monetary and CO2 terms – that capture the additional (new) technology installed after that year. My work provides a first overview of the magnitude and distribution of these coefficients in recent years across China’s rapidly growing economy for which marginal coefficients could be expected to differ greatly from average coefficients and are responsible for the substantial increase in CO2 emissions. To answer the second question regarding which industries and trade conditions are stimulating the increase in CO2 emissions, I first explore the countries and sectors recording an increase or decrease in energy footprints during the decades from 1990-2010. I then highlight the effect of international outsourcing of energy-intensive production processes by decomposing the structural and spatial change in energy footprints. This energy data is then further converted to CO2 emission data to disintegrate total CO2 emissions for each country into contributions from various driving forces acting on the domestic economy and international trade. The results reveal that consumption is outpacing efficiency by accelerating energy consumption and CO2 emissions, and that a world-wide shifting of energy-intensive and emissions-intensive production across borders has happened.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/13604
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13604
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.