Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/2123/13570
Title: Human neural precursor cells and iron-oxide nanoparticles: relevance to neurodevelopment and neural repair
Publisher: University of Sydney
School of Medical Science and Bosch Institute
Department of Anatomy and Histology
Description: We were able to identify neuroblasts as one of the main candidates involved in phagocytosing apoptotic cells which occurs during the peak of programmed-cell death in early neurogenesis. This biological phenomenon was found to be regulated through the P2X7 scavenger receptor, thus contributing towards a better understanding of the processes involved in the regulation of embryonic neurogenesis. Furthermore, we studied the interactions between nanoparticles and neural precursor cells in order to provide clinically relevant data for future cell transplantation studies and possible use in stem cell therapies. Nanoparticles at low concentrations proved to be viable contrast agents for labelling cells prior to MRI visualisation, however at higher concentrations the cells underwent apoptosis through the ablation of mitochondria function, offering a dual role as an MRI contrast agent or as a target-specific drug delivery vehicle. The biological impacts that nanoparticles had on neural precursor cell mitochondrial function suggests potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CNS-related diseases and damage, and hence possible therapeutic targets and treatment regimens. Overall, this thesis was able to enhance our understanding of neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration, as well as provide valuable information for future for cell tracking and transplantation studies.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/13570
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13570
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Human neural precursor cells and iron-oxide nanoparticles: relevance to neurodevelopment and neural repair
Publisher: University of Sydney
School of Medical Science and Bosch Institute
Department of Anatomy and Histology
Description: We were able to identify neuroblasts as one of the main candidates involved in phagocytosing apoptotic cells which occurs during the peak of programmed-cell death in early neurogenesis. This biological phenomenon was found to be regulated through the P2X7 scavenger receptor, thus contributing towards a better understanding of the processes involved in the regulation of embryonic neurogenesis. Furthermore, we studied the interactions between nanoparticles and neural precursor cells in order to provide clinically relevant data for future cell transplantation studies and possible use in stem cell therapies. Nanoparticles at low concentrations proved to be viable contrast agents for labelling cells prior to MRI visualisation, however at higher concentrations the cells underwent apoptosis through the ablation of mitochondria function, offering a dual role as an MRI contrast agent or as a target-specific drug delivery vehicle. The biological impacts that nanoparticles had on neural precursor cell mitochondrial function suggests potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CNS-related diseases and damage, and hence possible therapeutic targets and treatment regimens. Overall, this thesis was able to enhance our understanding of neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration, as well as provide valuable information for future for cell tracking and transplantation studies.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/13570
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13570
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Human neural precursor cells and iron-oxide nanoparticles: relevance to neurodevelopment and neural repair
Publisher: University of Sydney
School of Medical Science and Bosch Institute
Department of Anatomy and Histology
Description: We were able to identify neuroblasts as one of the main candidates involved in phagocytosing apoptotic cells which occurs during the peak of programmed-cell death in early neurogenesis. This biological phenomenon was found to be regulated through the P2X7 scavenger receptor, thus contributing towards a better understanding of the processes involved in the regulation of embryonic neurogenesis. Furthermore, we studied the interactions between nanoparticles and neural precursor cells in order to provide clinically relevant data for future cell transplantation studies and possible use in stem cell therapies. Nanoparticles at low concentrations proved to be viable contrast agents for labelling cells prior to MRI visualisation, however at higher concentrations the cells underwent apoptosis through the ablation of mitochondria function, offering a dual role as an MRI contrast agent or as a target-specific drug delivery vehicle. The biological impacts that nanoparticles had on neural precursor cell mitochondrial function suggests potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of CNS-related diseases and damage, and hence possible therapeutic targets and treatment regimens. Overall, this thesis was able to enhance our understanding of neurodevelopment and neurodegeneration, as well as provide valuable information for future for cell tracking and transplantation studies.
URI: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/13570
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/13570
Appears in Collections:Postgraduate Theses

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.