Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/2027.42/24895
Title: Organic geochemistry of suspended and settling particulate matter in Lake Michigan
Authors: Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2300 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103, USA
Publisher: Elsevier
Description: Organic matter contained in particulate matter in Lake Michigan waters and sediments has been characterized by C/N ratios and by distributions of biomarker fatty acids, alkanols, sterols, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Differences in organic constituents of particulate matter from various depths and distances from shore indicate a complex interaction of production, transformation, and destruction of the organic matter contained in sinking particles. Near-surface material contains important contributions of landderived organic matter, presumably of eolian input. Midwater particles have predominantly aquatic organic material of algal origin. At the sediment-water interface, selective suspension of the finer fractions of surficial sediments enriches bottom nepheloid layers with these sediment size classes. As a result, near-bottom particulate matter has an aquatic biomarker character. Organic matter associated with sinking particles undergoes substantial degradation during passage to the bottom of Lake Michigan, and aquatic components are selectively destroyed relative to terrigenous components.
URI: https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/24895
More Information: Meyers, P. A., Leenheer, M. J., Eaoie, B. J., Maule, S. J. (1984/03)."Organic geochemistry of suspended and settling particulate matter in Lake Michigan." Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 48(3): 443-452. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/24895>
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V66-487669C-2S/2/eff87642179c173c3c37b614aec39a54
http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/24895
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0016-7037(84)90273-4
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Appears in Collections:Research Collections

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Organic geochemistry of suspended and settling particulate matter in Lake Michigan
Authors: Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2300 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103, USA
Publisher: Elsevier
Description: Organic matter contained in particulate matter in Lake Michigan waters and sediments has been characterized by C/N ratios and by distributions of biomarker fatty acids, alkanols, sterols, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Differences in organic constituents of particulate matter from various depths and distances from shore indicate a complex interaction of production, transformation, and destruction of the organic matter contained in sinking particles. Near-surface material contains important contributions of landderived organic matter, presumably of eolian input. Midwater particles have predominantly aquatic organic material of algal origin. At the sediment-water interface, selective suspension of the finer fractions of surficial sediments enriches bottom nepheloid layers with these sediment size classes. As a result, near-bottom particulate matter has an aquatic biomarker character. Organic matter associated with sinking particles undergoes substantial degradation during passage to the bottom of Lake Michigan, and aquatic components are selectively destroyed relative to terrigenous components.
URI: https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/24895
More Information: Meyers, P. A., Leenheer, M. J., Eaoie, B. J., Maule, S. J. (1984/03)."Organic geochemistry of suspended and settling particulate matter in Lake Michigan." Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 48(3): 443-452. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/24895>
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V66-487669C-2S/2/eff87642179c173c3c37b614aec39a54
http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/24895
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0016-7037(84)90273-4
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Appears in Collections:Research Collections

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Organic geochemistry of suspended and settling particulate matter in Lake Michigan
Authors: Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Oceanography Program, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA;Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2300 Washtenaw Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103, USA
Publisher: Elsevier
Description: Organic matter contained in particulate matter in Lake Michigan waters and sediments has been characterized by C/N ratios and by distributions of biomarker fatty acids, alkanols, sterols, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Differences in organic constituents of particulate matter from various depths and distances from shore indicate a complex interaction of production, transformation, and destruction of the organic matter contained in sinking particles. Near-surface material contains important contributions of landderived organic matter, presumably of eolian input. Midwater particles have predominantly aquatic organic material of algal origin. At the sediment-water interface, selective suspension of the finer fractions of surficial sediments enriches bottom nepheloid layers with these sediment size classes. As a result, near-bottom particulate matter has an aquatic biomarker character. Organic matter associated with sinking particles undergoes substantial degradation during passage to the bottom of Lake Michigan, and aquatic components are selectively destroyed relative to terrigenous components.
URI: https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/handle/2027.42/24895
More Information: Meyers, P. A., Leenheer, M. J., Eaoie, B. J., Maule, S. J. (1984/03)."Organic geochemistry of suspended and settling particulate matter in Lake Michigan." Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 48(3): 443-452. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/24895>
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V66-487669C-2S/2/eff87642179c173c3c37b614aec39a54
http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/24895
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0016-7037(84)90273-4
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Appears in Collections:Research Collections

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.