Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/1956/16097
Title: "Alt hva mødrene har kjempet". En analyse av det kvinnepolitiske arbeidet i Kjerringråd - kvinnepolitisk tidsskrift 1975-1986
subject: Mastergrad;713107
Publisher: The University of Bergen
Description: <p>The master thesis aims to map and debate how the Norwegian magazine, Kjerringråd – Kvinnepolitisk tidsskrift (loosely translated to The Women’s counsel’s magazine), published between 1975-1986, portrayed different political women’s issues that interested the feminist environment at the time. The women behind the magazine all had a background in academia, and this influenced the contents that they embraced. The main political focus in this thesis is the fight for self-determined abortion, the fight against pornography, the debate surrounding the newly established discipline Women’s Studies, and the debate of feministic misandry vs. sisterhood.</p> <p>Kjerringråd aimed to be an unbiased project linked to the feminist political movement in Norway. The movement was a pluralist movement, gathering several different organisations and groups, each with their own individual political expression- and focus. The biggest groups were Kvinnefronten and Nyfeministene. Kjerringråd invited a range of people people, with diverse connections/affiliations in the women’s movement, to write and debate, striving to cover the Norwegian feminist movement as a whole. However, in their struggle to initiate a more united and cooperative feminist movement in Norway, Kjerringråd ended up choosing sides in several of the political woman issues, and therefore also failed in their ambitions to be an unbiased project. It seems that Kjerringråd especially did not approve of Kvinnefronten’s political expression, and their connection to the political party AKP, and argued that any organisation within the women’s movement should strive to remain independent from any political party, to ensure their freedom. </p> <p>The magazine was affiliated with the political Left and their political values, but in the 80’s, when the political environment changed from Left to Right, Kjerringråd did not follow. They did not agree with the new focus on the individual over the community, and continued their work and style from the 70’s, not wanting to change. After the movement had won their biggest fights in the 70’s (self-determined abortion being the biggest), it also seems that Kjerringråd struggled to find new and engaging topics to write about, that would reunite the feminist energy from the 70’s. Neither did they follow the modernisation of the public media, that in the 80’s found new and more efficient ways to reach the public. In many respects Kjerringråd became outdated, and in a time when the women’s movement was losing members they did not manage to hold on to their readers. Since the beginning all work related to the magazine (editing, writing, lay out, etc.) had been done on a voluntarily basis, and after eleven years the editorial community moved on to other projects.</p>
Historie mastergradsoppgave
HIS350
MAHF-HIS
URI: https://bora.uib.no/handle/1956/16097
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/1956/16097
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Humanities

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: "Alt hva mødrene har kjempet". En analyse av det kvinnepolitiske arbeidet i Kjerringråd - kvinnepolitisk tidsskrift 1975-1986
subject: Mastergrad;713107
Publisher: The University of Bergen
Description: <p>The master thesis aims to map and debate how the Norwegian magazine, Kjerringråd – Kvinnepolitisk tidsskrift (loosely translated to The Women’s counsel’s magazine), published between 1975-1986, portrayed different political women’s issues that interested the feminist environment at the time. The women behind the magazine all had a background in academia, and this influenced the contents that they embraced. The main political focus in this thesis is the fight for self-determined abortion, the fight against pornography, the debate surrounding the newly established discipline Women’s Studies, and the debate of feministic misandry vs. sisterhood.</p> <p>Kjerringråd aimed to be an unbiased project linked to the feminist political movement in Norway. The movement was a pluralist movement, gathering several different organisations and groups, each with their own individual political expression- and focus. The biggest groups were Kvinnefronten and Nyfeministene. Kjerringråd invited a range of people people, with diverse connections/affiliations in the women’s movement, to write and debate, striving to cover the Norwegian feminist movement as a whole. However, in their struggle to initiate a more united and cooperative feminist movement in Norway, Kjerringråd ended up choosing sides in several of the political woman issues, and therefore also failed in their ambitions to be an unbiased project. It seems that Kjerringråd especially did not approve of Kvinnefronten’s political expression, and their connection to the political party AKP, and argued that any organisation within the women’s movement should strive to remain independent from any political party, to ensure their freedom. </p> <p>The magazine was affiliated with the political Left and their political values, but in the 80’s, when the political environment changed from Left to Right, Kjerringråd did not follow. They did not agree with the new focus on the individual over the community, and continued their work and style from the 70’s, not wanting to change. After the movement had won their biggest fights in the 70’s (self-determined abortion being the biggest), it also seems that Kjerringråd struggled to find new and engaging topics to write about, that would reunite the feminist energy from the 70’s. Neither did they follow the modernisation of the public media, that in the 80’s found new and more efficient ways to reach the public. In many respects Kjerringråd became outdated, and in a time when the women’s movement was losing members they did not manage to hold on to their readers. Since the beginning all work related to the magazine (editing, writing, lay out, etc.) had been done on a voluntarily basis, and after eleven years the editorial community moved on to other projects.</p>
Historie mastergradsoppgave
HIS350
MAHF-HIS
URI: https://bora.uib.no/handle/1956/16097
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/1956/16097
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Humanities

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: "Alt hva mødrene har kjempet". En analyse av det kvinnepolitiske arbeidet i Kjerringråd - kvinnepolitisk tidsskrift 1975-1986
subject: Mastergrad;713107
Publisher: The University of Bergen
Description: <p>The master thesis aims to map and debate how the Norwegian magazine, Kjerringråd – Kvinnepolitisk tidsskrift (loosely translated to The Women’s counsel’s magazine), published between 1975-1986, portrayed different political women’s issues that interested the feminist environment at the time. The women behind the magazine all had a background in academia, and this influenced the contents that they embraced. The main political focus in this thesis is the fight for self-determined abortion, the fight against pornography, the debate surrounding the newly established discipline Women’s Studies, and the debate of feministic misandry vs. sisterhood.</p> <p>Kjerringråd aimed to be an unbiased project linked to the feminist political movement in Norway. The movement was a pluralist movement, gathering several different organisations and groups, each with their own individual political expression- and focus. The biggest groups were Kvinnefronten and Nyfeministene. Kjerringråd invited a range of people people, with diverse connections/affiliations in the women’s movement, to write and debate, striving to cover the Norwegian feminist movement as a whole. However, in their struggle to initiate a more united and cooperative feminist movement in Norway, Kjerringråd ended up choosing sides in several of the political woman issues, and therefore also failed in their ambitions to be an unbiased project. It seems that Kjerringråd especially did not approve of Kvinnefronten’s political expression, and their connection to the political party AKP, and argued that any organisation within the women’s movement should strive to remain independent from any political party, to ensure their freedom. </p> <p>The magazine was affiliated with the political Left and their political values, but in the 80’s, when the political environment changed from Left to Right, Kjerringråd did not follow. They did not agree with the new focus on the individual over the community, and continued their work and style from the 70’s, not wanting to change. After the movement had won their biggest fights in the 70’s (self-determined abortion being the biggest), it also seems that Kjerringråd struggled to find new and engaging topics to write about, that would reunite the feminist energy from the 70’s. Neither did they follow the modernisation of the public media, that in the 80’s found new and more efficient ways to reach the public. In many respects Kjerringråd became outdated, and in a time when the women’s movement was losing members they did not manage to hold on to their readers. Since the beginning all work related to the magazine (editing, writing, lay out, etc.) had been done on a voluntarily basis, and after eleven years the editorial community moved on to other projects.</p>
Historie mastergradsoppgave
HIS350
MAHF-HIS
URI: https://bora.uib.no/handle/1956/16097
More Information: http://hdl.handle.net/1956/16097
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Humanities

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.