Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://localhost:80/handle/1956/12266
Title: Obligations of poor countries in ensuring global justice: The case of Uganda
subject: global justice;obligations;poor countries;Uganda;VDP::Humaniora: 000::Filosofiske fag: 160::Etikk: 164;VDP::Humanities: 000::Philosophy: 160::Ethics: 164
Publisher: Programme for Applied Ethics, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Description: Obligations of global justice rest mainly on the global rich but also to a lesser extent on the global poor. The governments of poor countries are obliged to fulfill requirements of non-aggression, good governance and decency, along with all other requirements which facilitate the achievement of global justice. So far, obligations of poor countries seem to be taken as given yet the behavior of governments in poor countries and occurrences therein attest to the contrary;this suggests a need to mainstream these obligations in discussions about global justice. If poor countries do not live up to these requirements obstacles arise to the realization of global justice; and they act unjustly in relation to citizens of rich countries which provide them with aid. Uganda is taken as a case in point.
publishedVersion
Journal Article
URI: http://localhost:80/handle/1956/12266
More Information: Etikk i praksis 2014, 8(2):82-96
http://hdl.handle.net/1956/12266
1215571
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Humanities

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Obligations of poor countries in ensuring global justice: The case of Uganda
subject: global justice;obligations;poor countries;Uganda;VDP::Humaniora: 000::Filosofiske fag: 160::Etikk: 164;VDP::Humanities: 000::Philosophy: 160::Ethics: 164
Publisher: Programme for Applied Ethics, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Description: Obligations of global justice rest mainly on the global rich but also to a lesser extent on the global poor. The governments of poor countries are obliged to fulfill requirements of non-aggression, good governance and decency, along with all other requirements which facilitate the achievement of global justice. So far, obligations of poor countries seem to be taken as given yet the behavior of governments in poor countries and occurrences therein attest to the contrary;this suggests a need to mainstream these obligations in discussions about global justice. If poor countries do not live up to these requirements obstacles arise to the realization of global justice; and they act unjustly in relation to citizens of rich countries which provide them with aid. Uganda is taken as a case in point.
publishedVersion
Journal Article
URI: http://localhost:80/handle/1956/12266
More Information: Etikk i praksis 2014, 8(2):82-96
http://hdl.handle.net/1956/12266
1215571
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Humanities

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Obligations of poor countries in ensuring global justice: The case of Uganda
subject: global justice;obligations;poor countries;Uganda;VDP::Humaniora: 000::Filosofiske fag: 160::Etikk: 164;VDP::Humanities: 000::Philosophy: 160::Ethics: 164
Publisher: Programme for Applied Ethics, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Description: Obligations of global justice rest mainly on the global rich but also to a lesser extent on the global poor. The governments of poor countries are obliged to fulfill requirements of non-aggression, good governance and decency, along with all other requirements which facilitate the achievement of global justice. So far, obligations of poor countries seem to be taken as given yet the behavior of governments in poor countries and occurrences therein attest to the contrary;this suggests a need to mainstream these obligations in discussions about global justice. If poor countries do not live up to these requirements obstacles arise to the realization of global justice; and they act unjustly in relation to citizens of rich countries which provide them with aid. Uganda is taken as a case in point.
publishedVersion
Journal Article
URI: http://localhost:80/handle/1956/12266
More Information: Etikk i praksis 2014, 8(2):82-96
http://hdl.handle.net/1956/12266
1215571
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Humanities

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.