Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/1807/95444
Title: Only Connect: Three Reflections on the Sociality of Secularism
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Description: This is an accepted manuscript published by Cambridge University Press.
The three reflections joined together in this essay develop a notion of “the sociality of secularism”—a phrase that gestures to how secularism structures the social field, becoming an intimate part of the practice of self for subjects who are always inextricably intertwined with others in a network of connectedness that is central to what it means to be worldly. The first reflection, by following the English word priestcraft to colonial India, delineates a mode of Enlightenment focused on persons not ideas. The second asks how the secularist division between the public and the private relegated religion to the feminized domestic sphere. The third argues that postcolonial ethics has, from its inception, presented the self as inherently social. A substantial conclusion unites these threads by asking how religio-political writing from colonial India can reframe contemporary debates about the place of the “free” subject in the global political order.
URI: https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/95444
More Information: Scott, J. (2019). Only Connect: Three Reflections on the Sociality of Secularism. The Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, 6(1), 48-69.
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95444
https://doi.org/10.1017/pli.2018.29P
Appears in Collections:University of Toronto Mississauga

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Only Connect: Three Reflections on the Sociality of Secularism
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Description: This is an accepted manuscript published by Cambridge University Press.
The three reflections joined together in this essay develop a notion of “the sociality of secularism”—a phrase that gestures to how secularism structures the social field, becoming an intimate part of the practice of self for subjects who are always inextricably intertwined with others in a network of connectedness that is central to what it means to be worldly. The first reflection, by following the English word priestcraft to colonial India, delineates a mode of Enlightenment focused on persons not ideas. The second asks how the secularist division between the public and the private relegated religion to the feminized domestic sphere. The third argues that postcolonial ethics has, from its inception, presented the self as inherently social. A substantial conclusion unites these threads by asking how religio-political writing from colonial India can reframe contemporary debates about the place of the “free” subject in the global political order.
URI: https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/95444
More Information: Scott, J. (2019). Only Connect: Three Reflections on the Sociality of Secularism. The Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, 6(1), 48-69.
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95444
https://doi.org/10.1017/pli.2018.29P
Appears in Collections:University of Toronto Mississauga

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Only Connect: Three Reflections on the Sociality of Secularism
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Description: This is an accepted manuscript published by Cambridge University Press.
The three reflections joined together in this essay develop a notion of “the sociality of secularism”—a phrase that gestures to how secularism structures the social field, becoming an intimate part of the practice of self for subjects who are always inextricably intertwined with others in a network of connectedness that is central to what it means to be worldly. The first reflection, by following the English word priestcraft to colonial India, delineates a mode of Enlightenment focused on persons not ideas. The second asks how the secularist division between the public and the private relegated religion to the feminized domestic sphere. The third argues that postcolonial ethics has, from its inception, presented the self as inherently social. A substantial conclusion unites these threads by asking how religio-political writing from colonial India can reframe contemporary debates about the place of the “free” subject in the global political order.
URI: https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/95444
More Information: Scott, J. (2019). Only Connect: Three Reflections on the Sociality of Secularism. The Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, 6(1), 48-69.
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95444
https://doi.org/10.1017/pli.2018.29P
Appears in Collections:University of Toronto Mississauga

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.