Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dlib.scu.ac.ir/handle/1807/95443
Title: Translated Liberties: Karsandas Mulji’s Travels in England and the Anthropology of the Victorian Self
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Description: This is an accepted manuscript published by Cambridge University Press.
Through an analysis and historical contextualization of Gujarati writer Karsandas Mulji's Travels in England (1866), this article makes two interrelated arguments. First, Indian liberals' efforts to translate notions of liberty exposed the gap between liberalism's subtractive and additive projects, its abolition of customary constraints on the subject and its imposition of new constraints. Second, Mulji's travelogue suggests the complexity of anthropology in post-1850s India, when an amateur form of social science persisted alongside the emergence of the ethnographic state. As an amateur ethnologist, Mulji drew freely on source material from Henry Mayhew to Samuel Smiles to present England as a moral template for India. His turn to self-help or self-improvement literature, moreover, suggests the global scope of a mid-Victorian ethical culture that set the stage for the ethical concerns of anticolonial thinkers like M. K. Gandhi.
URI: https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/95443
More Information: Scott, J. B. (2017). Translated liberties: Karsandas mulji's travels in England and the anthropology of the Victorian self. Modern Intellectual History, 1-31.
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95443
doi:10.1017/S1479244317000579
Appears in Collections:University of Toronto Mississauga

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Translated Liberties: Karsandas Mulji’s Travels in England and the Anthropology of the Victorian Self
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Description: This is an accepted manuscript published by Cambridge University Press.
Through an analysis and historical contextualization of Gujarati writer Karsandas Mulji's Travels in England (1866), this article makes two interrelated arguments. First, Indian liberals' efforts to translate notions of liberty exposed the gap between liberalism's subtractive and additive projects, its abolition of customary constraints on the subject and its imposition of new constraints. Second, Mulji's travelogue suggests the complexity of anthropology in post-1850s India, when an amateur form of social science persisted alongside the emergence of the ethnographic state. As an amateur ethnologist, Mulji drew freely on source material from Henry Mayhew to Samuel Smiles to present England as a moral template for India. His turn to self-help or self-improvement literature, moreover, suggests the global scope of a mid-Victorian ethical culture that set the stage for the ethical concerns of anticolonial thinkers like M. K. Gandhi.
URI: https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/95443
More Information: Scott, J. B. (2017). Translated liberties: Karsandas mulji's travels in England and the anthropology of the Victorian self. Modern Intellectual History, 1-31.
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95443
doi:10.1017/S1479244317000579
Appears in Collections:University of Toronto Mississauga

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.
Title: Translated Liberties: Karsandas Mulji’s Travels in England and the Anthropology of the Victorian Self
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Description: This is an accepted manuscript published by Cambridge University Press.
Through an analysis and historical contextualization of Gujarati writer Karsandas Mulji's Travels in England (1866), this article makes two interrelated arguments. First, Indian liberals' efforts to translate notions of liberty exposed the gap between liberalism's subtractive and additive projects, its abolition of customary constraints on the subject and its imposition of new constraints. Second, Mulji's travelogue suggests the complexity of anthropology in post-1850s India, when an amateur form of social science persisted alongside the emergence of the ethnographic state. As an amateur ethnologist, Mulji drew freely on source material from Henry Mayhew to Samuel Smiles to present England as a moral template for India. His turn to self-help or self-improvement literature, moreover, suggests the global scope of a mid-Victorian ethical culture that set the stage for the ethical concerns of anticolonial thinkers like M. K. Gandhi.
URI: https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/95443
More Information: Scott, J. B. (2017). Translated liberties: Karsandas mulji's travels in England and the anthropology of the Victorian self. Modern Intellectual History, 1-31.
http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95443
doi:10.1017/S1479244317000579
Appears in Collections:University of Toronto Mississauga

Files in This Item:
Click on the URI links for accessing contents.